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THE CANCER TREATMENT

TOXICITIES GROUP

Supportive care makes excellent cancer care possible 

The Cancer Treatment Toxicities Group (CTTG) is a dynamic and innovative research initiative at The Adelaide Medical School (The University of Adelaide). The CTTG is comprised of three active research groups: The Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology Laboratory (Joanne Bowen), The Microbiome Research Laboratory (Rachel Gibson) and the Clinical Pharmacogenomics Laboratory (Janet Coller), uniting their strengths to tackle supportive oncology. The CTTG conducts both fundamental and translational research, aiming to integrate the pathogenesis, prediction and prevention of cancer related side effects. The CTTG regularly collaborates with national and international peers to deliver a program of clinically-relevant research. Our ethos is that supportive care makes excellent cancer care possible; with people affected by cancer at the core of our research goals.

 

                            CTTG GROUP MEMBERS

 

JOANNE BOWEN, PHD

A/Prof Bowen heads the Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology Laboratory, a central node of the CTTG. Her research focuses on the molecular control of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity, a common and costly side effect of cancer therapy. She was awarded an NHMRC Australian-based Biomedical Training Fellowship (2009 – 2012) to conduct novel research focused on discovery of peripheral blood mRNA expression profiles associated with risk of toxicity during treatment for oesophageal cancer. Joanne is dedicated to mentoring young researchers , acting as the coordinator of both the honours and HDR programs at the Adelaide Medical School. She was also appointed the Deputy Associate Dean for Gender Equity and Diversity, highlighting her dedication to women in science.

RESEARCH PROJECTS

 

THE MICROBOME AND GASTROINTESTINAL TOXICITY

This program of research aims to uncover 1) the role of the microbiome in symptom generation, 2) the relationship between an individual's microbiome and their risk of developing GI toxicity and 3) methods of exploiting the microbiome to enhance the outcomes of cancer treatment.

GUT-BRAIN AXIS AND COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

An increasing body of evidence implicates gut bacteria and neurocognitive function. This project aims to understand how an individual's microbiome affects their risk of developing neurocognitive side effects during cancer therapy, and the mechanisms underpinning gut-brain communication in people with cancer.

GENETIC PREDICTORS OF
TOXICITY RISK

There is currently no way to predict an individual's risk of developing treatment toxicity. This program of research aims to uncover pharmaco- and immuno-genetic markers predictive of treatment response to help support and provide personalised treatment strategies to high risk patients.

CHARACTERISING TOXICITY PROFILES OF NEW ANTICANCER AGENTS

Over the past decades, new treatments for cancer have been developed. These treatments are unfortunately associated with side effects similar to chemotherapy/radiotherapy, but are inherently different in their pathobiology. The CTTG has been highly active in characterising and understanding these new agents, with the aim of identifying therapeutic targets.

GET IN TOUCH

Dr Hannah Wardill, PhD 

Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide

Department of Paediatric Oncology, The University of Groningen (UMCG)

@ToxicitiesGroup | @hannahrwardill

University Medical Centre Groningen; Hanzeplein 1, Postbus 30 001, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands